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Findings from the 2014 MISO Survey Print Page
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Findings from the 2014 MISO Survey

Findings from the 2014 MISO Survey

Since 2006, the MISO (Measuring Information Service Outcomes) Survey has been a resource for liberal arts colleges to measure how faculty, students, and staff view library and computing services.  In 2012, Wabash IT Services and Lilly Library offered the MISO survey for the first time.  We have had tremendous participation in the 2012 and 2014 survey, surpassing our peers for response rates among faculty, students, and staff.

Response Rates

2014 National

2014 Wabash

All Faculty

59.6%

78.4%

Students (Stratified random sample)

47.4%

53.1%

All Staff (except Library and IT)

53.5%

67.1%

 

 Importance and Satisfaction with Library Resources and Services

One clear finding from the 2014 MISO survey is that faculty and students alike rate three items highly in terms of importance and satisfaction:  Databases, Access to online resources from off-campus, and Overall Library Services.
 

Faculty in 2014

Sorted by

 

Students in 2014

Sorted by

 

Resource / Service

Importance

Satisfaction

Resource / Service

Importance

Satisfaction

Databases

3.96

3.8

Access to online resources from off-campus

3.68

3.49

Access to online resources from off-campus

3.87

3.36

Seating, Lighting, etc.

3.6

3.42

Online Catalog

3.78

3.59

Databases

3.51

3.69

Interlibrary Loan

3.75

3.89

Group Study Spaces

3.5

3.47

Overall Library Services

3.74

3.79

Quiet Study Spaces

3.5

3.6

Library support for your students’ scholarly research

3.38

3.82

Public Computers

3.43

3.57

Circulation

3.28

3.89

Overall Library Services

3.4

3.57

Ease of Finding Physical Materials

3.28

3.79

Ease of Finding Physical Materials

3.3

3.46

Input into library decisions that affect you

3.28

3.53

Study Carrels

3.3

3.62

Library support for your scholarly research

3.26

3.75

Input into library decisions that affect you

3.08

3.37

Physical Collections

3.25

3.38

Library Web Site

2.98

3.51

Library Web Site

3.18

3.68

1832 Brew

2.95

3.64

Seating, Lighting, etc.

3.16

3.53

Circulation

2.85

3.55

Reference

3

3.72

Physical Collections

2.85

3.55

1832 Brew

2.81

3.71

Reference

2.84

3.5

Library research instruction for academic courses

2.81

3.7

Research Instruction

2.79

3.46

Quiet Study Spaces

2.79

3.67

E-Book Collections

2.77

3.39

E-Book Collections

2.69

3.26

Interlibrary Loan

2.58

3.49

Group Study Spaces

2.47

3.68

Research Guides

2.54

3.39

Research Guides

2.31

3.58

 

Note:  MISO uses the following four-point scale:

Scale

 Importance

Satisfaction

4

Very Important

Satisfied

3

Important

Somewhat Satisfied

2

Somewhat Important

Somewhat Dissatisfied

1

Not Important

Dissatisfied

 Other Findings

  • Both faculty and students rate physical collections as more important than e-book collections, even though the  student rating of the importance of the physical collections declined dramatically in 2014.
  • Since 2014, the importance of circulation services has been stable for faculty, but it is increasingly important for students.  All but two faculty were satisfied with circulation and interlibrary loan. Students were also satisfied with the services to a slightly lesser degree. Student satisfaction with circulation has declined significantly, which corresponds to a national trend.
  • The importance of 1832 Brew is increasing in importance, particularly among students.  In fact, the greatest increase in importance among students was for 1832 brew.
  • For faculty, the interlibrary loan service has consistently been more important than it is for students.
  • Students value group study spaces, quiet study spaces, and comfortable seating and lighting as more important than faculty do, but the importance of these resources are increasing among both populations. In fact, the greatest increase in importance among faculty is for quiet study spaces.  Both faculty and students expressed increasing satisfaction with the group study spaces.
  • Even though faculty and students value access to databases, the importance of the library website itself is modest.
  • Reference assistance and research instruction are becoming less important for faculty and students. The national trend is for the value of reference assistance to decline slightly while the value of research instruction to increase slightly.
  • Overall, faculty tend to be more satisfied than students across the full range of library services/
  • Faculty and students expressed a high degree of satisfaction with reference services in 2012, but in concert with the national trend, this satisfaction level declined in 2014.
  • Students expressed the least satisfaction with input into library decisions that affect them. This satisfaction level has declined since 2012. The national trend is for satisfaction in this area to increase.

 

In 2014, faculty and staff expressed identical levels of awareness of library services and resources, with students at a somewhat lower level. 

Respondents who feel informed or very informed about the following

Faculty and Staff

Students

Available library services

60%

57%

Copyright and Fair Use

49%

43%

Who to contact for copyright and Fair Use needs

51%

30%

Who to contact for your library needs

78%

58%

 

 

 

Prepared by Jeff Beck (March 2015)

 
 

The Lilly Library is a founding member of PALNI, ALI, and The Oberlin Group

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